\ Coos Soil and Water Conservation District (Coos SWCD) - Coos & Coquille Agricultural Water Quality Management Area Plan & Fact Sheets



Fact Sheets

These are fact sheets created by Bessie Joyce in 2002 about the Coos & Coquille Agricultural Water Quality Management Area Plan, and the information about positive management practices in still very relevant.


PDF - Coos & Coquille Water Quality Rules   COOS_COQUILLE_RULES_2002.PDFSpacer(230KB)
These are the water quality rules outlined in the Coos & Coquille Water Quality Plan.

PDF - Water Quality Plan   COOS_COQUILLE_2010_PLAN.PDFSpacer(1228.2KB)
It is the comprehensive water quality management plan developed by the Local Advisory Committee which was updated in 2010.

PDF - Fact Sheet   PESTICIDE MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(73.9KB)
Improper use of pesticides may impact fish and other aquatic species. We are all effected by pesticide use. Positive Management Practices. Conditions that may lead to a water quality problem and unacceptable conditions.

PDF - Fact Sheet   NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(65.5KB)
Animal waste runoff pollutes water and can lead to significant fish kills. Positive Management Practices. Conditions that may lead to a water quality problem and unacceptable conditions.

PDF - Fact Sheet   RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(49KB)
Riparian areas are important as they serve to: stabilize banks, capture and filter excess sediment, nutrients, and chemicals from runoff, recharge the groundwater and aquifers, provide shade for keeping water cool. Dissipate energy from flooding, and provide food and habitat for fish and other wildlife.

PDF - Fact Sheet   SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(94KB)
Excessive sediment levels negatively affect beneficial uses. Keep soil on your land. Positive Management Practices. Conditions that may lead to a water quality problem and unacceptable conditions.

PDF - Fact Sheet   PASTURE MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(66.5KB)
Good management of pastures and grazing can: enhance infiltration of precipitation, help prevent soil erosion, filter sediment during high rainfall and flooding, reduce net nutrient loads to waterways through uptake in plant and animal tissues, help enhance protective and productive soil cover, and provide habitat for a variety of wildlife.

PDF - Fact Sheet   IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT.PDFSpacer(51.1KB)
Major objectives for good irrigation management practices include knowing the precise amount of water to apply for the soil type in order to: minimize surface runoff and minimize deep percolation.



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